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Letter CCXV. 2821

To the Presbyter Dorotheus.

I took the earliest opportunity of writing to the most admirable Count Terentius, thinking it better to write to him on the subject in hand by means of strangers, and being anxious that our very dear brother Acacius shall not be inconvenienced by any delay.  I have therefore given my letter to the government treasurer, who is travelling by the imperial post, and I have charged him to shew the letter to you first.  I cannot understand how it is that no one has told you that the road to Rome is wholly impracticable in winter, the country between Constantinople and our own regions being full of enemies.  If the route by sea must be taken, the season will be p. 255 favourable; if indeed my God-beloved brother Gregory 2822 consents to the voyage and to the commission concerning these matters.  For my own part, I do not know who can go with him, and am aware that he is quite inexperienced in ecclesiastical affairs.  With a man of kindly character he may get on very well, and be treated with respect, but what possible good could accrue to the cause by communication between a man proud and exalted, and therefore quite unable to hear those who preach the truth to him from a lower standpoint, and a man like my brother, to whom anything like mean servility is unknown?



Placed in 375.


i.e. of Nyssa, an unsuitable envoy to Damascus.

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