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p. 462b

Chapter III

1. WHEN Yokovrana went to the temple to do sacrifice, the high priest besought him to consult the oracle in reference to the child, and for his kingdom's sake. And he so consulted the oracle, and the angels of Ormazd said unto him: O king, thou, before whom all people fear, hear thou the angels of heaven and be wise, for thy kingdom's sake, and for Capilya. Behold, thou hast maintained the custom of thy forefathers, and caused to be slain on the altar of thy God, Dyaus, twelve young men and twelve virgins for every day of the twelfth new moon, that by blood thy God might triumph on the earth, and that thou mightst be the most feared of kings. And thou hast subdued all the regions of the rich earth to honor thee and thy laws.

2. Therefore, the God of heaven saith thou shalt no longer pursue the sacrifice of human blood, but instead thereof make sacred the blood of the lamb, which shall be called the Lamb of thy God. And in the day of thy first sacrifice, thou shalt bring Capilya to the altar, and sprinkle the blood of the lamb thou hast slain upon his head, as a blood offering to thy God. And he shall be called CAPILYA, THE LAMB OF HEAVEN.

3. To this the king assented, and Capilya was accordingly sprinkled with the blood of a lamb, which was sacrificed in the altar of the king. Thus ended the first of the evil edicts of the evil Gods of Vind'yu; and from that time after mortals were no longer sacrificed to the Gods, by consent of the kings.

4. Capilya was called Yokovrana's son; and he was taught all things which it was lawful in those days to teach a prince; and because he was prepared for the throne, he was made acquainted with the kings and governors of all the tributary cities and countries in the land of Vind'yu.

5. Of the matters of Capilya, hereinafter revealed, know ye that in all things he was directed by the angels of Jehovih (Ormazd).

6. When Capilya had attained maturity, he besought the king for leave to travel, saying to the king: Is not the greatest wisdom that which cometh by p. 463b the eye and the ear? And is it not wise that he who may some day become king should acquaint himself with his kingdom whilst he is yet young? For then, he will not only see and hear better than if he were old, but he will have time to weigh the nature of the government, as to its best adaptation to the people.

7. To this the king replied: Thou art already wise, my son; thou knowest sufficient of the earth and her people according to the laws of the ancients. Therefore to travel for wisdom's sake would be great folly. Thine eyes and ears are too sharp already; better is it for thee that thou seest not the people of thy kingdom. For the time may come when thou shalt need to use great severity upon them; therefore, to be strange with them, thy sympathy will not lead thee away from justice.

8. Capilya said: Thou reasonest will, O king; and because thou art wise, have I no credit in being wise also. For it must be true that a son hath his wisdom from his father. And since thou hast so wisely put me off with thy arguments, answer me this: Is it not profitable to a young prince, before he hath the cares of a mighty kingdom, to go abroad and enjoy the pleasure of the world?

9. The king said: There are but three pleasures in all the world: eating and drinking is one; sleeping is another; the presence of women is the third. Why, then, shall a man go abroad?

10. Capilya said: And yet thou hidest the true reason as to why thou desirest thy son not to travel.

11. The king said: If thou tell me the true cause, then shalt thou go whithersoever thou desirest.

12. Capilya said: First, then, I will say to thee that I rejoiced because thou didst deny me; for I so loved thee, O king, that I knew no joy but to remain with thee. And, moreover, thou so lovest thy son, thou wouldst not have him go far from thee?

13. The king was so delighted with this answer, he said: Of a truth, O prince, thou hast guessed aright. And if thou find it in thy heart to leave me for a season of travel, then will I indeed bear with thy loss until thou returnest.

p. 464b

14. Capilya traveled for nine years, and he went to the uttermost extent of the land of Vind'yu, east and west, and north and south. And because his nurse, who was, in fact, his real mother, had told him thousands of tales about the persecution of the Faithists, and their sufferings, he sought to obtain information of these scattered people, but as yet he knew not he was of that race.

15. At the end of nine years Capilya returned to Yatinghadatta, rich in knowledge as to the inhabitants of Vind'yu. And when he came before the king, Yokovrana, where he was received in great honor, he related the knowledge he had obtained of the country, its extent and grandeur, and its hundreds of great cities and innumerable people. To all of which wisdom the king lent a willing ear; and he declared Capilya was the wisest and most learned man in all the world.

16. And now was come the time when God, Son of Jehovih, came to establish Jehovih, and begin the deliverance of the Faithists, and to collect them together in the places designed for them.

Next: Chapter IV