Le Morte d'Arthur BOOK IX CHAPTER XXXV

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CHAPTER XXXV

How the prize of the third day was given to Sir Launcelot,
and Sir Launcelot gave it to Sir Tristram.

THEN all the estates and degrees high and low said of Sir
Launcelot great worship, for the honour that he did unto Sir
Tristram; and for that honour doing to Sir Tristram he was at
that time more praised and renowned than an he had overthrown
five hundred knights; and all the people wholly for this
gentleness, first the estates both high and low, and after the
commonalty cried at once:  Sir Launcelot hath won the field
whosoever say nay.  Then was Sir Launcelot wroth and ashamed, and
so therewithal he rode to King Arthur.  Alas, said the king, we
are all dismayed that Sir Tristram is thus departed from us.  By
God, said King Arthur, he is one of the noblest knights that ever
I saw hold spear or sword in hand, and the most courteoust knight
in his <414>fighting; for full hard I saw him, said King Arthur,
when he smote Sir Palomides upon the helm thrice, that he abashed
his helm with his strokes, and also he said:  Here is a stroke
for Sir Tristram, and thus thrice he said.  Then King Arthur, Sir
Launcelot, and Sir Dodinas le Savage took their horses to seek
Sir Tristram, and by the means of Sir Persides he had told King
Arthur where Sir Tristram was in his pavilion.  But when they
came there, Sir Tristram and Sir Dinadan were gone.

Then King Arthur and Sir Launcelot were heavy, and returned again
to the Castle of Maidens making great dole for the hurt of Sir
Tristram, and his sudden departing.  So God me help, said King
Arthur, I am more heavy that I cannot meet with him than for all
the hurts that all my knights have had at the tournament.  Right
so came Sir Gaheris and told King Arthur how Sir Tristram had
smitten down Sir Palomides, and it was at Sir Palomides' own
request.  Alas, said King Arthur, that was great dishonour to Sir
Palomides, inasmuch as Sir Tristram was sore wounded, and now may
we all, kings, and knights, and men of worship, say that Sir
Tristram may be called a noble knight, and one of the best
knights that ever I saw the days of my life.  For I will that ye
all, kings and knights, know, said King Arthur, that I never saw
knight do so marvellously as he hath done these three days; for
he was the first that began and that longest held on, save this
last day.  And though he was hurt, it was a manly adventure of
two noble knights, and when two noble men encounter needs must
the one have the worse, like as God will suffer at that time.  As
for me, said Sir Launcelot, for all the lands that ever my father
left me I would not have hurt Sir Tristram an I had known him at
that time; that I hurt him was for I saw not his shield.  For an
I had seen his black shield, I would not have meddled with him
for many causes; for late he did as much for me as ever did
knight, and that is well known that he had ado with thirty
knights, and no help save Sir Dinadan.  And one thing shall I
promise, said Sir Launcelot, Sir Palomides <415>shall repent it
as in his unkindly dealing for to follow that noble knight that I
by mishap hurted thus.  Sir Launcelot said all the worship that
might be said by Sir Tristram.  Then King Arthur made a great
feast to all that would come.  And thus we let pass King Arthur,
and a little we will turn unto Sir Palomides, that after he had a
fall of Sir Tristram, he was nigh-hand araged out of his wit for
despite of Sir Tristram.  And so he followed him by adventure. 
And as he came by a river, in his woodness he would have made his
horse to have leapt over; and the horse failed footing and fell
in the river, wherefore Sir Palomides was adread lest he should
have been drowned; and then he avoided his horse, and swam to the
land, and let his horse go down by adventure.