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How King Anguish of Ireland was summoned to come to
King Arthur's court for treason.

THEN it fell that Sir Bleoberis and Sir Blamore de Ganis, that
were brethren, they had summoned the King Anguish of Ireland for
to come to Arthur's court upon pain of forfeiture of King
Arthur's good grace.  And if the King of Ireland came not in, at
the day assigned and set, the king should lose his lands.  So it
happened that at the day assigned, King Arthur neither Sir
Launcelot might not be there for to give the judgment, for King
Arthur was with Sir Launcelot at the Castle Joyous Garde.  And so
King Arthur assigned King Carados and the King of Scots to be
there that day as judges.  So when the kings were at Camelot King
Anguish of Ireland was come to know his accusers.  Then was there
Sir Blamore de Ganis, and appealed the King of Ireland of
treason, that he had slain a cousin of his in his court in
Ireland by treason.  The king was sore abashed of his accusation,
for-why he was come at the summons of King Arthur, and or he came
at Camelot he wist not wherefore he was sent after.  And when the
king heard Sir Blamore say his will, he understood well there was
none other remedy but for to answer him knightly; for the custom
was such in those days, that an any man were appealed of any
treason or murder he should fight body for body, or else to find
another knight for him.  And all manner of murders in those days
were called treason.

So when King Anguish understood his accusing he was passing
heavy, for he knew Sir Blamore de Ganis that he was a noble
knight, and of noble knights come.  Then the King of Ireland was
simply purveyed of his answer; therefore the judges gave him
respite by the third day to give his answer.  So the king
departed unto his lodging.  The meanwhile there came a lady by
Sir Tristram's pavilion making great dole.  What aileth you, said
Sir Tristram, that ye make such dole?  Ah, fair knight, said the
lady, I am ashamed unless that some good knight help me; for a
great lady of worship sent by me a fair child and a rich, unto
Sir Launcelot du Lake, and hereby there met with me a knight, and
threw me down from my palfrey, and took away the child from me. 
Well, my lady, said Sir Tristram, and for my lord Sir Launcelot's
sake I shall get you that child again, or else I shall be beaten
for it.  And so Sir Tristram took his horse, and asked the lady
which way the knight rode; and then she told him.  And he rode
after him, and within a while he overtook that knight.  And then
Sir Tristram bade him turn and give again the child.