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How Sir Launcelot and Sir Turquine fought together.

AND then they put their spears in the rests, and came together
with their horses as fast as they might run, and either smote
other in midst of their shields, that both their horses' backs
brast under them, and the knights were both stonied.  And as soon
as they might avoid their horses, they took their shields afore
them, and drew out their swords, and came together eagerly, and
either gave other many strong strokes, for there might neither
shields nor harness hold their strokes.  And so within a while
they had both grimly wounds, and bled passing grievously.  Thus
they fared two hours or more trasing and rasing either other,
where they might hit any bare place.

Then at the last they were breathless both, and stood leaning on
their swords.  Now fellow, said Sir Turquine, hold thy hand a
while, and tell me what I shall ask thee.  Say on.  Then Turquine
said, Thou art the biggest man that ever I met withal, and the
best breathed, and like one knight that I hate above all other
knights; so be it that thou be not he I will lightly accord with
thee, and for thy love I will deliver all the prisoners that I
have, that is three score and four, so thou wilt tell me thy
name.  And <188>thou and I we will be fellows together, and never
to fail thee while that I live.  It is well said, said Sir
Launcelot, but sithen it is so that I may have thy friendship,
what knight is he that thou so hatest above all other? 
Faithfully, said Sir Turquine, his name is Sir Launcelot du Lake,
for he slew my brother, Sir Carados, at the dolorous tower, that
was one of the best knights alive; and therefore him I except of
all knights, for may I once meet with him, the one of us shall
make an end of other, I make mine avow.  And for Sir Launcelot's
sake I have slain an hundred good knights, and as many I have
maimed all utterly that they might never after help themselves,
and many have died in prison, and yet have I three score and
four, and all shall be delivered so thou wilt tell me thy name,
so be it that thou be not Sir Launcelot.

Now, see I well, said Sir Launcelot, that such a man I might be,
I might have peace, and such a man I might be, that there should
be war mortal betwixt us.  And now, sir knight, at thy request I
will that thou wit and know that I am Launcelot du Lake, King
Ban's son of Benwick, and very knight of the Table Round.  And
now I defy thee, and do thy best.  Ah, said Turquine, Launcelot,
thou art unto me most welcome that ever was knight, for we shall
never depart till the one of us be dead.  Then they hurtled
together as two wild bulls rushing and lashing with their shields
and swords, that sometime they fell both over their noses.  Thus
they fought still two hours and more, and never would have rest,
and Sir Turquine gave Sir Launcelot many wounds that all the
ground thereas they fought was all bespeckled with blood.