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The Apostle passing into Munster was kindly received by Aongus, King of Cashel, who on being duly instructed presented himself for baptism. St. Patrick, as already mentioned, bore with him in all his journeys the Bacal Iosa, which he had received from the monks in the Tuscan Sea. As he was administering the Sacrament, filled with holy ardour, he raised in his left hand the stafi whose lower extremity was pointed with bronze, and, seeing in spirit the arch enemy of mankind prostrate at his feet, he forcibly struck it into the ground. He did not stir that arm until the ceremony was over, but then, on lifting the staff, he found the spike driven into the floor, through the instep of the king. "My son," said he, sorrow. fully, "why did you give no notice when you found your foot pierced through?" "Father," said the king, "though the torture was great, I strove to endure it. I looked on what you did as a necessary part of the rite." Patrick, stooping, and making the sign of the cross on the wound, the blood ceased to flow, and the sufferer was relieved of pain. He was then gladdened by these words addressed to him by the saint:--"For your piety and faith it shall be allowed to ten monarchs of your line to wear your crown in succession; and, one excepted, all shall be blessed with prosperous reigns."

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