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"Dhritarashtra said, 'Consider, O Duryodhana, O dear son, what I tell thee. Like an ignorant traveller thou thinkest, the wrong path to be the right one, since thou art desirous of robbing the energy of the five sons of Pandu, who are even as the five elements of the universe in their subtle form upholding all mobile and immobile things. Without the certain sacrifice of thy life thou art unable to vanquish Yudhishthira, the son of Kunti, who is the foremost of all virtuous persons in this world.

p. 147

[paragraph continues] Alas, like a tree defying the mighty tempest, thou chafest at Bhimasena who hath not his peer (among men) in might and who is equal unto Yama himself in battle. What man of sense would encounter in battle the wielder of Gandiva, who is the foremost of all wielders of weapons, as the Meru among mountains? What man is there whom Dhrishtadyumna, the prince of Panchala, cannot overthrow, shooting his arrows among the foes, like the chief of the celestials hurling his thunderbolt? That honoured warrior among the Andhakas and the Vrishnis, the irresistible Satyaki, ever engaged in the good of the Pandavas, will also slaughter thy host. What man of sense, again, would encounter the lotus-eyed Krishna, who, as regards the measure of his energy and power, surpasseth the three worlds? As regards Krishna, his wives, kinsmen, relatives, his own soul and the whole earth, put on one scale, weigheth with Dhananjaya on the other. That Vasudeva, upon whom Arjuna relieth, is irresistible, and that host where Kesava is, becometh irresistible everywhere. Listen, therefore, O child, to the counsels of those well-wishers of thine whose words are always for thy good. Accept thou thy aged grandsire, Bhishma, the son of Santanu, as thy guide. Listen thou to what I say, and what these well-wishers of the Kurus, Drona, and Kripa, and Vikarna, and king Vahlika say. These all are as I myself. It behoveth thee to regard them as much as thou regardest me, since, O Bharata, all these are conversant with morality and bear affection to thee as much as I myself do. The panic and rout, before thy eyes, at the city of Virata, of all thy troops with thy brothers, after surrender of the king,--indeed, that wonderful story that is heard of an encounter at that city between one and many, are sufficient proof (of the wisdom of what I say). When Arjuna singly achieves all that, what will not the Pandavas achieve when united together? Take them by the hands as thy brothers, and cherish them with a share of the kingdom.'"

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