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Wisdom of the Ages, by George A. Fuller, [1916], at

p. 193


Again my teachings have been misunderstood when thou sayest, oh, Neontu, that man should ever look inward. I have declared again and again that the source of all truth is within, but, at the same time, its streams are ever flowing outward toward the circumference. It is always well for thee to know the results that obtain in the physical domain. I have not found fault with the physical scientist because he studies the shell of the universe, but have tried to impress upon thee that it would be far wiser on his part if he would occasionally look within, and thus learn the source of all phenomena. Curb not the aspirations of thy nature that reach outwardly. Like ships sailing over unknown seas they may return laden with the richest of cargoes.

p. 194

[paragraph continues] Yet do I boldly declare unto thee that all the riches thou mayst be able to gather from the material realms will prove of little value unto thee unless thou art able to perceive in and through all the underlying spirit of all things. Here alone wilt thou be able to find permanency. The clothing thou wearest to protect thy body after a time is laid aside for new. And even the atoms that compose thy body are continually being discarded that their places may be given to others. The compelling power of all Nature that causes the ceaseless urge in every atom as well as in every flaming sun and star is spirit, the only Absolute Reality. Yet as spirit worketh in all, the humblest forms may teach thee important lessons. Ever have I sought to impress upon thee the sacredness of all things—that nothing is moving across the infinite stage of action aimless and purposeless. While I

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would not have thee ignore the organization, yet I would not have thee linger too long in the form-realm, for I would have thy spiritual sight opened, so that thou couldst behold the architect of each and every form. The form may be indeed beautiful, but far more beautiful is always the builder of that form. If ye delve simply amid the outward forms, mystery will ever enshroud all things. To thy vision the face of Nature will ever wear an impenetrable veil. But if thou wilt cultivate the interior senses, they that be of the spirit, it shall be thy privilege to lift the veil from the face of Nature, and in ecstacy almost divine, behold such beauty and glory as never before fell upon the vision of thy spirit.

It is true, oh, Neontu, that thou wouldst not have been placed in this outward world unless its lessons were of importance and value to thee. Therefore it is well that thou shouldst

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become a close student of all the many things that surround thee, but at the same time thou shouldst not allow thyself to become so thoroughly entangled in the meshes of the web that Maya weaves around thee that thou canst not at any moment free thyself and soar on the pinions of the soul to those heights around which the ethers of the heavenly spheres are ever playing. Be not content to plod on thy way, grovelling ever in the midst of those conditions that hold thee in the sphere of materiality, but instead develop that higher spirituality at whose bidding shall open all the secret chambers of being.