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Wisdom of the Ages, by George A. Fuller, [1916], at

p. 53


How unwise to say: How substantial and real is matter?

For matter is only a state of that which is substantial and real, an expression of energy.

Truly may it be said, matter is the appearance and not the reality.

Matter is ever changing, assuming many forms.

The substantial and real is unchanging and without form.

The undying energy of the universes is without form or shadow of variableness.

He alone establishes all things. He alone of all things is permanent, eternal, infinite.

From Him all things proceed and unto Him all shall yet return.

p. 54

I do not say that it is unwise to study the external that ye may know something of the house in which spirit dwells. Yet, would I ask, Is it not far better for man to know the real than the appearance?

The child busies itself with blocks of wood, building houses and castles as his fancy may direct. So the man of science far too often busies himself with things of no greater value, those that belong to the outer rim of things.

Would it not be wiser if he would seek the fountain-head, the source whence all proceed?

Yet, I would not be dictatorial, for each man must determine for himself the path he shall pursue.

Some will ever choose the longer way that leadeth at last to the truth; while others perceive the open way that leadeth straight as an arrow flieth to the coveted goal.

p. 55

It is not necessary for them who perceive the truth to linger in the valley because the many are not ready for the journey that leadeth to the heights where Peace dwells.

Once having fully recognized the power of the spirit, all power is thine to overcome and utilize the seeming obstacles of the world.

What were yesterday thine infirmities may become to-day the source of thy strength.

An error once conquered never shows its head to thyself again.

Ye are all children of the light, and darkness is your abiding place only through ignorance.

Be ye not obedient slaves to circumstances and conditions, but rise in the majesty of thy spirit, superior to all that hinders thy upward flight.

Live in the Higher Thought thyself thinkest—bask not only in the sunshine of spirit, but, in a measure, be that sunshine unto others,

p. 56

who are yet in the thick clouds of ignorance, and thou shalt rise higher and higher as the spirit ever wills.

Then, to thyself there shall be no other thought, save that of peace and love; and from out thine atmosphere shall melt all thought of evil and disease, as the fogs and mists melt from the earthly atmosphere at the coming of the morning sun.

Then, in spirit find the mighty solvent that dissipates all clouds that have obscured the inner vision.

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