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The Science of Mind, by Ernest Shurtleff Holmes [1926], at

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Lesson Six: Psychic Phenomena

Psyche means soul; psychic phenomena are the phenomena of the soul. We have already seen that what we call the soul is, really, the subjective part of us. We do not have two minds, but we do have a dual aspect of mentality in what we call the objective and subjective phases of mind. The objective mind is that part of the mentality which functions consciously; it is the part of us which really knows itself; and without it we would not be real of conscious entities.


Our subjective mind is our mental emanation in Universal Subjectivity; it is our individual use of mental law. It is also the avenue through which Instinctive Man works, carrying on the functions of the body; for it is the silent builder of the body. The subjective mind of the individual is the working of Instinctive Man within him, plus all of his conscious and subconscious experiences.


The subjective mind is the seat of memory and of instinctive emotion. Being the seat of memory, it contains a remembrance of everything that has ever happened to the outer man. This memory is perfect and retains every experience of the individual life. The subjective mind also contains many of the family and race characteristics which have been experienced by individualized man. It retains these memories, partly, at least, as mental pictures or impressions. This is proven by the fact that pictures have been taken of the subjective thought and definite outlines developed. This does not necessarily mean that every impression is retained as a mental picture, but that, in all probability, anything that the outer eye has definitely seen is retained as a more or less distinct picture.

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The subjective mind is a picture gallery, upon whose walls are hung the pictures of all the people whom the individual has ever known and all the incidents which he has ever experienced.


The subjective mind being deductive only in its reasoning powers is compelled by its nature to retain all the mental impressions that it has ever received. It, therefore, contains much that the objective mind has never consciously known. When we realize that the individual's subjectivity is his use of the One Subjective Mind, we shall see that a subjective unity is maintained between all people, and that individual mentalities which are in sympathetic vibration with each other must, more of less, mingle, and receive suggestions from each other. This is the meaning of mental influence, which is, indeed, a very real thing. This also means that the subjective mind receives suggestions from the race and is, more or less, influenced by its environment; all this takes place on the silent side of life and is mostly unknown to the receiver.

Race-suggestion is a very real thing, and each individual carries around with him, and has written into his mentality, many impressions that he never consciously thought of or experienced; for there is a silent influence going on at all times between people under this law.


It is almost certain that between friends there is, at all times, a silent communication, a sort of unconscious mental conversation going on subjectively. When this rises to the surface of conscious intelligence, it is called mental telepathy. This communication with others is going on at all times, whether the conscious mind is aware of the fact or not. We are always receiving impressions that are more or less vague, and it is seldom that they come to the surface; but they are there nevertheless and are gradually building into our mentalities impressions and forms of thought that are unconsciously and silently perceived.

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Since the subjective mind is the storehouse of memory, it retains all that the eye has seen, the ear heard or the mentality conceived. Since it contains much that the outer man never consciously knew, and is the receptacle of much of the race-knowledge, through unconscious communication, it must, and does, have knowledge that far surpasses the objective faculties.

Realizing that the subjective draws to itself everything that it is in sympathy with, or vibrates to, we see that any one who is sympathetically inclined toward the race, or vibrates to the race-thought, might pick up the entire race-emotion and experience, and, if he were able to bring it to the surface, he could consciously depict it. Many of the world's orators, actors, and writers have been able to do this; which explains the reason why many of them have been so erratic; for they have been more or less controlled by the emotions which they have contacted.

Our greatest speakers are able to contact the subjective mentality of their audiences and in this way, not only to tell the audience what it wishes to be told, but also to send out a strong vibration that will make an equally strong subjective impression on those who are listening. It is a well-known fact that many speakers are able to connect with the mentality of an audience in such a manner as to be able to completely control it. Napoleon seemed to be able to do this, which was one of the reasons why he had such tremendous influence over his followers.

Singers and poets generally enter into more or less of a subjective state while singing or writing. In the case of a singer or actor, this enables him to respond to the emotion of his listeners and to be able to reflect back to them an equally strong emotion. It might work the other way; that is, he might, himself, awaken the emotion in his hearers. This we call temperament, and no singer, speaker or actor can be a great success without it.

In the case of a writer, this enables him to enter into the race-thought and perfectly depict race-emotion and race-endeavor. Poets are an especially good example of this ability;

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for poetry, like song, is the language of the soul, and none can write good poems unless he allows the soul to come to the surface. We could not imagine a great poem written mechanically. Artists lose themselves in their work and musicians often do the same; this we call inspiration.

In preaching, it is probable that the orator of the pulpit often so enters into the longings of men's hearts that he reveals them to themselves. He is able to depict their thoughts and emotions, and coupling his own with theirs, give birth to a great discourse; we say that he is inspired.

Any one contacting the subjective side of the race-mentality with the ability to permit it to come to the surface, will have at his disposal a knowledge that many lifetimes of hard study could not possibly accumulate. But, if one had to surrender his individuality in the process, he would be better off to remain ignorant.

Enough has been said on this subject to show the source of human inspiration. There is, of course, a much deeper seat of knowledge than the subjective mind; that is, the Spirit. But direct contact with Spirit is Illumination, and is a quality which has been developed in but few people; the few who have developed this quality have given the world its greatest literature, religion and law.


Each person has a mental atmosphere which is the result of all that he has thought, said, done, and consciously or unconsciously perceived. This mental atmosphere is very real and is that subtle influence which constitutes the power of personal attraction; for personal attraction has but little to do with looks; it goes much deeper and is almost entirely subjective. This will explain the likes and dislikes for those with whom we come in daily contact. We meet some, only to turn away without a word, while others we are at once drawn toward, and without any apparent reason; this is the result of their mental atmosphere or thought vibration. No matter what the lips may be saying, the inner thought outspeaks them and the unspoken word often carries more weight

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than the spoken. As Emerson said: "What you are speaks so loudly that I cannot hear what you say."

In contacting people, we are instantly attracted or repelled, according to the vibrations which we feel. A person whose atmosphere is one of love and sunshine, whose nature is to be happy, who lives a clean, wholesome life in a free atmosphere, will always attract friends.

Children feel mental atmosphere very keenly and are drawn to those who are inwardly right, shunning those who are inwardly wrong. It has been truly said that people whom children and dogs do not like are dangerous. Animals are almost entirely subjective and feel mental atmospheres more keenly than do most people. A dog instinctively knows one's attitude toward him and, acting accordingly, is immediately a friend or foe. Personal atmospheres vary in their intensity, there being as many varieties as there are people; for each creates his own atmosphere in Mind.


Personal charm may be easily created by learning to love all and hate none. Truly did the great Emerson say: "If you want a friend, be one." If one wishes to have friends, he should become friendly; if he wishes love, he should learn to love. There is no excuse for any one being without a power of attraction, since it is a mental quality and may be consciously induced through right practice.


As all people have a mental atmosphere, so do all places; and as the atmosphere of people is the result of their thoughts, so the atmosphere of places is the result of the thoughts that have been created in them. Places are permeated with the thoughts of the people who inhabit them; in this way, mental atmospheres are created and may be easily felt by those contacting them.

How often we have had the experience of going into a place, only to feel that we were not wanted, and became so

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disturbed that we wished immediately to leave. How often, on the other hand, we have gone into places where we felt such a warmth and inner glow that we wished to remain. This is the result of the mental atmosphere surrounding the place or room. This is why we love our homes; they are filled with love and affection and we feel at peace within their walls. This is why one likes to return home after his day's work; for he knows that here is a place where he will be away from the world with all of its cares and worries. It is a wise wife who understands this law and who keeps the atmosphere of the home pleasant. Such a one will seldom lose her mate, but will hold him through the strong ties of love and affection with which she floods his abode. Many an unhappy home could be harmonized if this law were better understood and practiced.

The atmosphere of the home should never be clouded with the uncertainties of the outside world. Here, in the palace of human love, all else should be forgotten and an atmosphere maintained which will be a shelter from the world. Here love should be the ruling passion and harmony should reign supreme. Here, above all other places, should the Kingdom of God be established and families should dwell together in peace and joy.

Too often, jealousy and deceit rob the home of its joy, while mistrust and doubting make it so unpleasant that it becomes an impossible place in which to live. But all this can be changed by reversing the wrong thoughts and in their place creating thoughts of love and tenderness toward one another.

There is nothing more unfortunate for a child's mind than to be compelled to live in an unhappy home. The home should stand for heaven on earth, and unless it does, it will not stand long, but will be buried in the ashes of dead hopes.

The atmosphere of the desert is wonderful, for it is free from the thoughts of men's confusion and fear, and so is a place of great peace. Here, indeed, away from the haunts of men's terrible struggles, quiet may be found and peach regained. It is the same with the mountains, the lakes and the trackless deep. This is what we love about Nature; her marvelous calm and deep peace; for she speaks to us and

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tells of a life undisturbed by the strife of man. She does, indeed, bear a message from On High, and happy is the one who can talk to her and learn from her, for she is wonderful and filled with light.

Even the slightest things seem to be possessed of a soul, or subjective atmosphere. How often we see a familiar coat or hat hanging on a peg, while in it we seem to see the person who wears it; it seems to look like him, and so it does, for it retains the emanation of his atmosphere, and really is permeated with his personality. Everything has an atmosphere which we sense and to which we react accordingly; if it is pleasant we like it, and if unpleasant we dislike it.


Just as each person, place or thing has a subjective atmosphere or remembrance, so each town, city, or nation has it individual atmosphere. Some towns are bustling with life and action while others seem dead; some are filled with a spirit of culture, while others seem filled with a spirit of commercial strife. This is the result of the mentalities of those who live in these places. A city given over to the pursuit of the higher endeavors will react with an atmosphere of culture and refinement, while one whose dominant thought is to acquire wealth will react to an atmosphere of grasp and grab. This is very definite and is felt by all who enter such places.

Just as a city as its atmosphere, so does a whole nation; for a nation is made up of the individuals who inhabit it; and the combined atmospheres of all the people who inhabit a nation creates a national mentality which we speak of as the psychology of that people.


When we remember that Subjective Mind is Universal, we will come to the conclusion that the history of the race is written in the mental atmosphere of the globe on which we live. That is, everything that has ever happened on this planet has

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left its imprint on the walls of time; and could we walk down their corridors and read the writings, we should be reading the race history. This should seem simple when we realize that the vibrations of the human voice can be preserved in the receptive phonographic disc, and reproduced at will. If we were to impress one of these discs with the vibration of some one's voice and lay it away for a million years, it would still reproduce those vibrations.

It is not hard then to understand how the walls of time may be hung with the pictures of human events and how one who sees these pictures may read the race history.


Telepathy, or thought-transference, is such a commonly known fact that it is useless to do other than to discuss it briefly. However, there are some facts which might be overlooked unless we give them careful attention. The main fact to emphasize is that mental telepathy would not be possible unless there were a medium through which it could operate. This medium is Universal Mind; and it is through this medium that all thought-transference or mental telepathy takes place. Forms in matter and solid bodies may begin and end in space, but thought is more fluent.

Telepathy is the act of reading subjective thought, or of receiving conscious thought without audible words being spoken. But there must be a mental tuning in, so to speak, just as there must be in radio. We are surrounded by all sorts of vibrations, and if we wish to catch any of them distinctly, we must tune in; but there is a great deal of interference, and we do not always get the messages clearly. We often get the wrong ones, and sometimes many of the vibrations come together and seem to be nothing but a lot of noises, without any particular reason for being. It is only when the instrument is properly adjusted to some individual vibration that a clear message may be received.

This is true of mental telepathy, which is the transmission of thought. The receiver must tune in with the sender. It does not follow, however, that the sender knows that he is

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being tuned in on; in other words, one might pick up thoughts just as he picks up radio messages; and just as the one broadcasting may not know who is listening in, so the one sending out thought may not know who is listening in. Happily, but few people can listen in mentally, and these few only with more or less certainty of success. It would be terrible to be compelled to listen in on all the thoughts that are floating around. But, fortunately, we can only receive those messages to which we vibrate; and so the whole thing is a matter of our own choice. We are individuals in the mental world just as in the physical; and a wise person will protect himself mentally just as he would physically.


Some seem to have the ability to tune in on thought and to read it, much as one would read a book. These people we call psychics; but all people really are psychic, since all have a soul or subjective mind. What we really mean is, that a psychic or medium is one who has the ability to objectify that which is subjective; to bring to the surface of conscious thought that which lies below the threshold of the outer mind. The medium reads from the book of remembrance; and it is marvelous how far-reaching this book of remembrance is.


As everything must exist in the subjective world before it can in the objective, and as it must exist there as a mental picture, it follows that whatever may have happened at any time on this planet is today within its subjective atmosphere; i.e., the experiences of those who have lived here. These pictures are hung upon the walls of time, and may be clearly discerned by those who can read them.

Accordingly, since the Universal Subjectivity is a Unit and is Indivisible, all these pictures really exist at any, and every, point within It simultaneously; and we may contact anything that is within It at any point, because the whole of It is at every point. Consequently we may contact at the point of

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our own subjective mind (which is a point in Universal Subjective Mind) every incident that ever transpired on this planet. We may even see a picture that was enacted two thousand years ago in some Roman arena; for the atmosphere is filled with such pictures. This has been called "The Illusion of Mind" (the psychic sea). This does not mean that Mind is an illusion, but that it might present us with an illusion unless we are very careful and are quite sure that what we are looking at is a real form and not simply a picture.

It is very important that we understand this; for each person in his objective state is a distinct and individualized center in Universal Mind; but in his subjective state every one, in his stream of consciousness, or at his rate of vibration, is universal, because of the Indivisibility of Mind. Wherever and whenever any individual contacts another upon the subjective side of life, if he is psychic, i.e., if he objectifies subjectivity, he may see a thought form of that person, but it does not necessarily follow that he would be really seeing the person.


The conditions necessary for the best results in psychic work are faith and expectancy; for the subjective responds to faith and seems clouded by doubts. Doubt appears to throw dust in its eyes, while sympathetic faith and willing belief render the veil much thinner and the consequent messages much clearer. This explains why many unbelieving investigators fail to receive the desired results, and go away saying that the whole thing is a fraud. Whatever the nature of the subjective may be, we did not make and we cannot change it; we shall be compelled to use this force, like all other forces in nature, according to its own laws, and not according to the way we think it should act.

It has been completely proved that the subjective mentality responds more completely when fully believed in; and any one wishing to investigate the psychic life would much better accept this fact and act upon it, rather than dispute it and receive

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no results. If the law is complied with the results will be certain.

Some psychics go into a trance while giving subjective readings, while some can do this in a normal state. The trance state varies from a slight subjectivity to a completely submerged mentality, i.e., from simply getting in tune with thought while in a conscious state of mind, to becoming completely submerged in an unconscious state in order to get in tune with thought. It is never good to lose one's self-control, but many people do this and, in so doing, have brought to light remarkable evidence of the ability of the inner mind to perform wonderful tasks.


It is possible at times for a psychic to tell one most of the incidents that have happened in his life, and also to tell of his friends and many of the incidents that have happened to them. This is done by entering the subjective realm of the individual and reading the thoughts and mental pictures that are hung on the wall of his memory. When a psychic tells one something about his friends, he is entering their thought through the sympathetic vibration of the one whose thought he is reading. We are always in mental contact with our friends on the subjective side of life; and a psychic, tuning in on these vibrations, reads the thoughts that come over the mental wireless.


Often a psychic will enter a person's mentality and give him a fairly complete history of his past and of the family from which he came, going back, perhaps, for several generations, naming ancestors and the things that engaged their attention while on earth. He is reading the records of what has already happened and is a subjective remembrance of his family.

For instance, people have often said to me: "I saw Emerson standing behind you this morning." Of course they did not

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see Emerson; what they saw was a mental picture of him; the reason being that I am a student of Emerson, and each is surrounded by the forms of the people he knows and the forms of those whose thought he studies.


One is surprised when he goes to a medium and is told his own, and perhaps his mother's name, and is told by the medium that his mother stands beside him. The psychic often tells just how she looked while in the flesh. Now it might or might not be, that what the medium says is true; for, while this personality might be consciously near, the chances are more than even that she is not, but that the medium is simply looking at a picture of her as she once was while in the flesh.

A medium might, by reading one's subjectivity, be able to tell something about people who were not present at the time; because each, through a sympathetic vibration of thought, is connected with the subjective emanations of those whom he likes, of those with whom he is associated and of those to whom he vibrates. These people might be in the flesh or out of it.

The personal reading appears to be limited either to the immediate individual or to some one with whom he is in contact. The value of subjective mind reading is more or less uncertain. Generally all that a psychic can tell is about something that has already happened or something that might happen as the result of a subjective tendency already set in motion. There are, however, deeper messages than these.


Each, being an individual identity in Mind, is known by the name he bears, and by the vibration which he emanates. For, while we are all One in Mind and Spirit, we each have a separate and an individualized personality. This is the only way that Spirit can individualize, making it possible for many to live in the One.

Each, then, is represented by his stream of consciousness;

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and each, continuously functioning in Mind, builds around himself an aura or mental atmosphere, which, in its turn, is constantly flowing out as a stream of consciousness.

Because of the Unity of Mind, each is one with the All; and at the point where he contacts the All, he universalizes himself. This will be easily understood when we realize that man always uses the One Mind. He is in It and thinks into It; and because It is Universal, his thought may be picked up by any one who is able to tune in on that thought, just as we pick up radio messages. A radio message, broadcast from New York City, is immediately present all around the world. Hard as this concept may be to grasp, we know it to be the truth.

Let us shift the basis to mentality and we shall see that the same thing happens when we think. We think into the One Mind, and this thought is immediately present everywhere. It is in this sense that each one is universal. According to the Unity of Mind, thought is everywhere present, and so long as it persists it will be. What is known in one place may be known in all places.


Time, space and obstructions are unknown to Mind and thought. It follows, then, that any one tuning in on our thought will enter into our stream of consciousness, no matter where we are or where he may be. And if we still persist after the body shall have suffered the shock of physical death, this law must still hold good; for past and present are one and the same in Mind. Time is only the measure of an experience, and space, of itself, is not apart from, but is in, Mind.


A psychic can enter the stream of thought of any one whose vibration he can mentally contact, be that person in the flesh or out of it; and since we are all psychic, all having a soul element, we are all, doubtless, communicating with each other to the degree that we sympathetically vibrate toward each

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other. (This explains the medium through which absent treatment takes place.)

We do not all have the ability to objectify psychic impressions, and ordinarily they never come to the surface; however, they are there just the same. This is the reason why we often feel so uneasy when in the presence of certain people, or when we mentally contact some condition, having an uneasy inner feeling but without any apparent reason.


As we read and study people's thought, we gradually enter into the current of their consciousness and begin to read between the lines; we are unconsciously reading their inner mentalities. This is why we enjoy reading the thoughts of the great mentalities of all ages. More that is unwritten comes to us than mere words could possibly convey.


Many of the saints have seen Jesus in this way. That is, through studying His words and works, they have so completely entered His thought that they have seen a picture of Him; for the pictures of everything and everybody are hung on the walls of time and any one who can enter may read. It does not follow that these saints have seen Jesus, but that they have, without doubt, seen His likeness, or what the world believes to be His likeness, hung on the walls of time. When we look at a picture of a person we are not looking at the person, but at a likeness of him.


We are all surrounded by mental pictures, and a good psychic sees these pictures clairvoyantly and reads our thoughts telepathically. A good medium has the ability, more or less clearly, to bring these pictures and thoughts to the surface and objectify them; but it does not follow that he is really communicating with the people whose pictures he sees.

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Every one constantly radiates some kind of a vibration, and consequently is always surrounded by some kind of a mental atmosphere. This is called the aura; it extends from a few inches to a few feet from the body and sometimes even farther. It varies in color and density with the varying degrees of consciousness. In moments of spiritual realization the aura is bright yellow, merging into almost a pure white; and in moments of rage it is dark and murky in appearance. There are as many colors in the aura as there are varying degrees of thought-activity in the mentality.


The halo which artists have portrayed around the heads of the saints is real, and not an idea of the artists. There is a more pronounced emanation from the head than from any other part of the body, because thought operates through the brain more than through any other part of the human instrument.

It is said that the face of Jesus shone so brightly, at times, that His disciples could not look upon it without becoming blinded by its brilliancy.


In a combat of wills the atmosphere sometimes appears to strike sparks as though a battle were being waged on the subjective side of life. Unpleasant people always have a disagreeable atmosphere and morbid people always depress. A radiant aura emanates from the one who lives a normal, happy life, and who is always at peace within himself.


Habits are formed by first consciously thinking, and then unconsciously acting. But few realize that when one consciously thinks, something must happen to his thoughts. What

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one thinks to-day will to-morrow be a part of his memory; and since memory is active, what he thinks to-day as a conscious thought will to-morrow be submerged but active thought.

This is how a habit is formed; first it is a desire, then comes the expression of this desire, then the desire becomes subjective and the subconscious action of thought causes it to be performed automatically. First we control thought, then thought controls us.

"First the man takes a drink,
Then the drinks takes a drink,
Then the drink takes the man."

Constant repetition gradually forms such a thought force on the subjective side of life that the very force created, in its turn, controls the one who created it. How careful we should be about what we let down into the deeper currents of mentality! All habits are formed in much the same way; they are at first conscious; then they become unconscious or subconscious. A person may create such a strong desire that it will compel him to put it into execution; this is called mania.


Literally speaking, mania is a desire too strong to be controlled. We speak of one having a mania for certain things; that is, he has subjectified so much desire along some particular line that he becomes controlled by the very power which he has set in motion. Morbid people are more liable to do this than normally minded ones. For instance, let a sensitive person become despondent and he may think of committing suicide. This thought, at first, may be put aside as unworthy, but as it returns it receives a little more attention, until at last it may become so strong that it is irresistible.

Most murders are committed from this mental attitude; and most murderers are people who are mentally sick. Some day this will be better understood; such people will be considered sick and will be healed mentally. This shows how very careful we should be to control our thinking, never allowing the

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mentality to conceive ideas which we do not wish to see manifest. After all, these things are mental attitudes, and the best way to heal them is through mental treatment.


Obsession is another form of mental control and may or may not be conscious at its inception. People may become obsessed with desires, thoughts, ambitions, habits, suggestions or other mental influences; and if the spirits of undeveloped entities surround us, it seems entirely possible that people may become obsessed by them.

The obsession of desire produces a mania to express that desire; for thought demands an outlet. Some are so obsessed by their ambitions that they are constantly driven to the accomplishment of them. Some are obsessed by the suggestion of their environment, for the mental atmosphere of places often obsesses people, compelling them to do certain things and without any apparent reason. In studying a case of obsession we should take all the facts into consideration and reason from effect back to cause.


People often become mildly obsessed by the mentalities of those surrounding them; this is called personal contagion. Many take on the color of their environment, and this should be guarded against, for it is a mild form of hypnotism. It is, of course, brought about through the suggestive power of unconscious mental action, and may or may not be malicious. We should never allow ourselves to become controlled by anything that we do not consciously allow to enter the thought. If one feels an influence silently demanding attention, he should at once declare that there is no power, in the flesh or out of it, that can control him except, of course, the One Perfect Mind.


If we are surrounded by discarnate spirits, they, also, might

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control us through suggestion; that is, if we allowed them to do so. By thinking toward us with a strong desire, they might so implant this desire on the subjective side of our thought that it would come up from within, causing us to do certain things which we never consciously thought of doing. This, of course, is hypnotic influence; but all mental influence is hypnotic, varying only in degree. If it is true that discarnate spirits are around us (and it appears to be true), we should carefully guard against the possibility of any mental influence from them. The statement that ONLY THE ONE MIND CONTROLS will protect us from any and all wrong mental influences of whatever nature, whether emanating from those in the flesh or out of it.


All obsession, of whatever character, is some form of mental influence, and can easily be destroyed by making the above stated affirmation. We should never for one instant allow the suggestions of other mentalities to control us. The day will come when people will choose the thoughts that they allow to enter the mind as carefully as they now choose the food they eat. Staying close to the thought of the One Mind is a safe and sure protection from any and all wrong mental influence.


Insanity is the complete control of the conscious mind by the unconscious or subjective mind. Dwelling too long on one idea, or some sudden shock, seems to produce this state. It is easily healed by knowing that there is but ONE MIND, AND THAT IT CANNOT FORGET ITSELF. THERE IS ONE MIND IN GOD, AND THIS MIND OUR MIND NOW.


The psychic power should always be under full control of the conscious mind; otherwise, all sorts of influences may be

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picked up, which, operating under the guise of seemingly real individualities, control the one who admits them. When the psychic power is under full control of the conscious mind, it furnishes a wonderful storehouse of knowledge; for, being the seat of memory of both the individual and the race, it contains much that we do not consciously know.


A normal condition would be a complete balance between the objective and subjective mentalities. This would give an immediate access to all the wisdom of the human race, and might even extend much farther, for it could give access to a higher state, which is now more or less clogged by contrary suggestions.

The subjective side of thought is the sole and only medium between the relative and the Absolute. If one were in full control of his inner mentality he could, at once, enter the Absolute, and his every word would bear fruit. Jesus was such an One.

In attempting to accomplish this we do not have to come under control of any power other than that of our inner selves and our higher selves; anything less than this is dangerous. Many seem to think that simply because they are under control they must be dealing with spiritual power. NO GREATER MISTAKE WAS EVER MADE. Jesus, Who was fully illumined, always kept His full state of conscious thought and personal volition.


The aim of evolution is to produce a man who, at the objective point of his own self-determination, may completely manifest the inner life of the Spirit. Even the Spirit does not seek to control us, for It lets us alone to discover ourselves.

The most precious thing that man possesses is his own individuality; indeed, this is the only thing that he really has, or is; and for one instant to allow any outside influence to enter or control this individuality is a crime against man's real self.

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The trance state is any state of mentality that allows itself to become submerged. It varies in degree from simply allowing the mind to become receptive, which is harmless, to a complete self-denial of the objective consciousness, i.e., allowing any and all influences to be picked up. This is very dangerous.

There are many normal psychics who can, while in a perfectly objective state, read people's thoughts and perform many other wonderful feats of the mind. This is normal and no harm can come from it. It is, indeed, one of nature's ways of working and is most interesting.


Any psychic power that can be used while in a normal state of mind is harmless and helpful; that is, any psychic power which can be used while one is in a perfectly conscious state of mentality. Many have this power and find that it is helpful as well as interesting. This power can be developed by knowing that the WITHIN AND THE WITHOUT ARE REALLY ONE.


Abnormal psychic powers are developed in the full trance state; that is, when the medium becomes controlled by surrounding influences. In this state some wonderful and hidden powers of mind are revealed.

In certain psychic states people can see, hear and read others' thoughts; travel abroad and perform many other marvelous feats, which in the conscious state seem impossible. No doubt the time will come when all these powers will be under the control of the conscious mind; man will then be much less limited.


Clairvoyance is a state of mentality wherein the medium is able to see things that the objective eye cannot see under normal

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conditions. It is the physical eye reproduced on the mental side of life, only with a greatly extended vision. Time, space and obstructions are swept away, and the operator can as easily look through a closed door as, in a normal state, he looks through a window.


Psychometry is a clairvoyant state wherein the operator is able to psychometrize, or read from the soul or subjective side of things. Mention has already been made of the fact that everything has its mental atmosphere which is the result of the thoughts surrounding it. To psychometrize anything means to read from this mental atmosphere and to tell what it radiates. Sometimes the operator seems able to take a piece of ore or metal and give a perfect description of the location from which it was taken. This will explain why some mediums wish to hold an object which has been used by the sitter; for through this avenue the medium is able to enter the inner thought of the person sitting.


Clairaudience may be called the ear of the soul; it is the ability to hear the inner voice speak, and is a most remarkable mental attribute. Some hear these voices silently, while to some they come as independent voices.

It appears as though the instinctive man tries to tell the outer man of certain things or to give him warnings. Sometimes these warnings come as visions and sometimes in dreams. This power is uncertain and should be carefully watched, as we are not always able to tell whether the impression is real or simply some suggestion of a surrounding mental influence. A good way to test this is to know that all impressions must come from the Perfect Mind.


Sometimes independent voices speak forth, apparently from the air, and may be conversed with by the hour. I have talked

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with these voices, but, so far, have not been able to determine whether or not they ever told anything beyond the subjective knowledge of those present. I have been unable to satisfy myself as to whether they were caused by those present in the flesh or whether they were caused by some form of spirit life. The fact remains that such voices do speak and that they are real. I have held animated and interesting conversations with such voices hours at a sitting, and it has been a most wonderful experience; but, so far, it seems impossible to determine their exact nature. Time and a more complete investigation alone can give the real proof.


Apparitions, or thought forms, often appear during mental stress. For instance, people often see some friend just before he passes from this life. Sometimes the apparition appears before the incident takes place; an explanation of this will be made later in this chapter. This type of phenomenon is not at all uncommon; nearly every one has some record of such experiences. When one is asleep he is entirely subjective, and this will explain why so many of the above referred to incidents take place during sleep. But impressions received while in the sleeping state do not always come to the surface.


People often see the forms of those who have passed from this life. Many have been alarmed over seeing such forms, as though there might be danger from them; but whether or not we believe them to be the forms of the dead or the living, they certainly can do no harm.

It is claimed by some that ghosts are always the result of some form of violent death, and that those who pass out in a state of peace never leave a ghost behind. Of the truth of this statement I am NOT absolutely sure, since all must leave behind the forms used while in the flesh, and each must leave behind him a thought form of himself.

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It is a well-known fact that ghosts sometimes have the ability to speak or convey some kind of a message to the living. And it is also generally conceded by those who have investigated such matters, that once a ghost has had the opportunity to speak, it is seldom ever seen again.

If we suppose a ghost to be a real entity, we can easily see how it could speak or telepathically convey a message. If, on the other hand, we assume that a ghost is only a form of thought, we can imagine that it might be equipped with the power to convey a message, after which it would gradually fade away. For thought has some power to express itself. I hold no brief for either case, since I have been unable to make up my own mind as to just what a ghost really is.

In such a case as this it is a mistake to assume anything, other than the fact that such appearances do make themselves known to people under certain conditions. The matter will have to rest at this point until further investigation proves what a ghost is.


Under certain states of mentality it is possible to project the mentality and travel far from the body. Just what it is that projects is difficult to say; and we are not so much concerned about what it is that projects as we are interested in the fact that there is something about the mentality which can project itself. Since there is but One Mind, perhaps nothing has to project; perhaps we simply see through the One Mind, which must have and hold, within Itself, all that is.


Crystal gazing is a form of concentrating the mentality in such a manner as to make it possible for the subjective to come to the surface. The operator, looking steadily at a bright object, gradually becomes subjective and consequently able to read thought.

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Black Magic has been taught and practiced from time immemorial. It is the act of thinking toward some one for the purpose of doing him an injury.


To-day, black magic is called by another name, but "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." To-day it is called malpractice. Malpractice takes several different forms; namely, malicious, ignorant and unconscious. Malicious malpractice is the act of arguing in Mind that some certain person is something that he ought not to be. In some cases it is supposed to even take the form of saying that he is not present in the flesh. If this were persisted in, and the one being damned should receive the condemnation, he might begin to feel sick; and if this were carried to a final conclusion, he would, perhaps, "pass from this vale of tears."

Mention is made of this, not as being something to fear, but as one of those things which to-day is being more or less discussed and believed in by many. So far as we are concerned, we believe only in the One Mind, AND WE KNOW THAT IT CANNOT BE DIVIDED AGAINST ITSELF. This will settle the question of malicious malpractice for all time.

We hear of people who live in constant terror of malpractice, and it seems certain that some do try to use this force to do injury to others; but no one with real understanding of the Truth will be affected by it, nor seek to use it; for this would be playing with fire; and we are the servants to the things which we obey.

If our thought is still operating on a level where such things are possible, we had better find it out, straighten up our thought and be healed; for, after all, malpractice is only wrong thought suggestion, and we do not believe in wrong thought suggestion.

Innocent and ignorant malpractice causes much disease and discomfort, through sympathy with sickness and fear for people's safety. We should sympathize with the one suffering, but

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never with that from which he suffers; for this would make him worse instead of better.


Automatic writing is an interesting phenomenon of the mind. It is a mental control which uses the arm and hand for the purpose of writing messages.

There are several forms of automatic writing; one, the Ouija board, which is small smooth board, upon which is written the alphabet. Upon this board is placed a small, pear-shaped, three-legged instrument, which points to the letters and spells out words. Another form is to put a pencil through the board; and still another form, and one even more interesting, is when the pen is held in the hand which is controlled by some force not known, but supposed to be the subjective thought of either the operator or of some one present.

Some believe that the arm is under control of a discarnate spirit. Many and long have been the discussions on this point, and I do not care to enter into them; but one thing is certain, the phenomenon transpires, and many wonderful messages come through in this manner.


The most interesting writing of all is what is called independent writing; that is, where the pencil simply tips up and writes without any one touching it. I have seen this done and can vouch for its reality. Here, indeed, is ample cause for speculation, and we are compelled to admit that either some unconscious force of those present grasps the pencil, or that some spirit force does.


I am well aware of the theory which Hudson worked out along these lines, but I have not been able to explain everything on his basis; and I fear that he overworked his theory.

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His idea was that we have no right to assume the presence of an unknown agency when there is a known one present. In other words, he said that the phenomenon is caused by some form of mental action which he called subjective; and that we have no right to assume a spirit to be the cause when we know that there are people present in the flesh; and that, since people in the flesh, as well as those out of it, have a mind, we must assume that the phenomena are caused by those present in the flesh. By the same token, and with the same logic, it could be proved either way. That psychic phenomena are caused by some form of mental power, there can be no question; and the student of the workings of mind will rest content here, knowing that mental power can operate in independence of the physical instrument; for this is the great lesson to learn.


A most peculiar and interesting phenomenon takes place in the act of smelling where there is, apparently, nothing to smell. The mentality, in connecting with the vibrations of a rose, can produce its odor independently of the presence of the flower.

I have seen a case where the vibrations of a certain man were brought into the room when he was in an intoxicated condition. The smell of whiskey was so strong that the influence was asked to remove its presence. Perhaps this is what is meant by occult perfume.


It is a commonly known fact, to those who have spent time investigating these thing, that objects are grasped and held independently of the physical touch. This is shown in independent writing and in telekinetic energy.


Telekinetic energy is defined as "the ability to move ponderable objects without physical contact." This form of energy is displayed in that class of mental phenomena which cause

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objects to move without any physical agency, and is, therefore, caused by some form of mental energy, or by some agency other than physical.


Table tipping is so common as to cause but little comment, but it does help to prove a principle of mind, namely, that an object can be moved about from place to place without the aid of any physical contact.


Rappings on the walls and floor are also too common to mention, but should be classed in the category of telekinetic energy.


One of the investigators has advanced the theory of ectoplasm, which is a formless stuff emanating from the body of the medium. I have no doubt but this theory is correct as far as it goes; but am not willing to advance it as being sufficient to explain all the phenomena. For instance, according to this theory, if any one stands in front of the medium the emanation is blocked and no results will follow. I have sat in a room and had a glass of water brought from another room and held to my lips while I drank it. It was a real glass and real water and I was really there, and in a perfectly normal state of mind. I could not possibly account for the above-stated incident on the theory of ectoplasm; but I could account for it through the theory of mental power.


The theory of ectoplasm certainly will not account for levitation, where the body of the medium is lifted from a chair and carried to some other place in the room. This can be accounted for only on the theory that there is a power that transcends the better-known physical laws. Experience has taught that there are many things in life that cannot be accounted

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for on any other basis than that of a mind power which operates independent of any, and of all, physical agencies.


It is interesting to realize that we have such marvelous powers; and no doubt the time will come when we shall make common use of them. They are for some purpose and, as we live in a Timeless Universe, this purpose will be made known just as soon as we are ready for it.


Whether psychic phenomena are caused by the agency of spirits or by some inner power of our own mentality makes no difference. That they are caused by mind power is apparent; for they are not caused by what we call physical force at all, but by some finer power than we, at present, well understand.


It gives reason for thought when we realize that such inner powers exist. Some power, independent of the body, can see, hear, feel, smell, touch and taste without the aid of the physical instrument. Some power of intelligence within us can travel, communicate, project itself, recognize and be recognized, without the aid of the physical instrument. That there is a reason for this is certain; that this reason is natural and normal, no one can doubt, for nature is always natural, and only that is a mystery which is not understood.


Time and experience, alone, will unravel the mysteries of the human mind, with its many and varied activities. So far we have but touched the outskirts of its garments. To deny these inner attributes is not only intolerant, but is downright ignorance. It is all right to say that we do not understand

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them; but to openly deny them is to place us, not among the unbelievers, but among those who do not know the facts.


Subjective mind can deduce only; it has no power of initiative or self-choice, and is compelled, because of its very nature, to retain any and all suggestions that it receives. The best illustration of this is in the creative soil, in which the gardener puts his seed. The soil does not argue nor deny, but goes to work on the seed and begins to create a plant which will represent the type of manifestation inherent, as an idea, in the seed. That is, from a cucumber seed we get cucumbers; and from a cabbage seed we get cabbages. Always the law maintains the individuality of the seed as it creates the plant; never does it contradict the right of the seed to be what it really is. Involved within the seed is the idea of the plant, as are also those lesser ideas which are to act as a medium between the seed and the plant. Involved within the seed are both cause and effect; but the seed must first be placed within the creative soil if we wish to receive a plant. In the creative soil, or in the seed, the full and perfect ideas of the plant must exist as a completed thing, else it could never be brought forth into manifestation.

The idea of the full-grown plant must exist somewhere in the seed and soil if it is ever going to materialize.


This teaches us a lesson in subjectivity. Thoughts going into the subjective are like seeds; they are concepts of ideas, and acting through the creative medium of Mind, have within themselves the full power to develop and to express themselves. But how could they express unless they were already known to Mind? They could not, and so Mind must view the thought as already completed in the thing; and Mind must also contain the avenue through which the idea is to be expressed. Every thought sets in motion in Mind the fulfillment of its purpose, and Mind sees the thing as already done.

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Mental tendencies set in motion cast their shadows before them; and a psychic often sees the complete manifestation of an idea before it has had the time to materialize in the objective world.

This is what constitutes the average spirit of prophecy; for prophecy is the reading of subjective tendencies, and seeing them as already accomplished facts. The subjective mind can deduce only, but its power of logic and sequence appears to be perfect.


For illustration, suppose that there is a window one mile away; I am throwing a ball at this window, and the ball is halfway to it, going at the rate of one mile a minute. Now you come in, measure the distance, compute the speed with which the ball is passing through the air and say, "The ball is halfway to the window; it is traveling at the rate of one mile a minute; in just one half a minute the window is going to be broken by the ball passing through it." Let us suppose that you are the only one who sees the ball, for the rest are looking at the window; and in half a minute it is broken. How did you prophesy that the window was to be broken? By drawing a logical conclusion of an already established premise.

This is much like what happens when a psychic exercises a spirit of prophecy. They are generally unconscious as to why they do what they do, because they are getting their own subjective contact with the condition and simply interpreting what comes to them. But this is the logical, deductive, conclusive power of their subjective thought, seeing a thing completed, by first seeing a tendency set in motion, and computing the time that it will take to complete it. There are but few, however, who have any reliable spirit of prophecy.

Let us carry this thought further; the race has its subjectivity, from an individual to a nation. This is its karma, its subjective law set in motion. Each nation has its subjective causation, and the prophet of a nation could, and would, read its subjective tendency; and this is what the old prophets

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did, for they were psychics, every one of them, from Moses down. They were able to interpret the subjective causation of their race and so predict that certain things must follow.

There is, however, a still higher spirit of prophecy which but few have perceived, and those who have perceived it have been illumined. Within the subjective mirror of Mind there must also exist the Divine and Cosmic Purposes,--the very Thoughts of God. An illumined person, who is also psychic, might read these great Cosmic Purposes; and in this manner some of the great prophets have read the destiny of the race. They have told us that the destiny of man is divine, that he is immortal now, that he need not die to become immortal, but that HE IS IMMORTAL. It was in contact with this great Law, and from It, that Moses received the Ten Commandments, the Mosaic Law. It is through the avenue of subjectivity, which is the medium between Spirit and man, between the Absolute and the intellect, that all of the prophets have prophesied and all of the sages have taught; for it contains Infinite Wisdom, Knowledge and Law.

The subjective mind is the source of much inspiration; for it contains all the thoughts which the race has ever created, and at times one contacts these thoughts and becomes inspired by them. The subjective mind is the source of much revelation because it contains the Purposes of God, and if the soul were to turn to the One, it surely would reflect into the outer mind the Light of the Eternal.


We have shown that mind, independent of the body, can, and at times does, perform each and every function which we usually associate with the physical being. While most people may have to go into a trance state to perform these acts, there are a few who can produce the same results while in a perfectly normal state, that is, while in a self-conscious state. I wish to make this very plain, for there is a belief that an abnormal state must be entered into before these phenomena can be produced. I not only challenge such a statement, but entirely

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refute it as being altogether wrong. I have myself, while in a perfectly normal state, seen or experienced nearly everything that has been discussed under this heading.

I am willing to admit that ordinarily a trance state is developed before the best results can be obtained; but to say that it MUST be developed is to contradict my own experience and refute my own observations. I have never, at any time, gone into a trance state, and would no more consider doing so than I would consider jumping from the roof of a ten-story building. If, then, I were to refute my sanity during these experiences, by what manner of judgement could I consider myself to be sane at all? It is useless for those who know nothing at all about psychic phenomena to deny its reality. I can understand any one saying that he does not understand it, but I cannot grasp the position of an individual who denies something of which he is entirely ignorant.

We will say then THAT EVERY ACT OF THE HUMAN INSTRUMENT WHICH WE CALL THE BODY CAN BE REPRODUCED THROUGH SOME AGENCY WHICH IS NOT PHYSICAL, OR THROUGH SOME AGENCY THAT PHYSICS CANNOT EXPLAIN. We will call this agency some power of mind with which we are not yet well familiar. It is all simple enough, anyway, for our bodies could not move unless we were here to move them, and so every act is mental, even though we use the body as an instrument.

I can find no explanation for the above-stated facts, unless we suppose that we have a mental body which reproduces the physical one; and which can function without its counterpart, and is entirely independent of it.

It makes no difference whether we attribute the phenomena to spirits or whether we say that we are unconsciously producing it ourselves, THE FACT WILL STILL REMAIN THAT THE PHENOMENA ARE PRODUCED and can be accounted for only on the basis that we either have a mental body, which acts independent of the physical one, or that the power of thought alone, and without any physical instrument, can operate upon matter. Personally, I prefer to accept the theory that we have a mental body, since this appeals

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to me as being more reasonable and certainly much more human.

If we assume that spirits have the ability to move ponderable objects without physical contact, we are assuming that they have a mental body, or that they operate their thought to produce the phenomena. For, once granted that the phenomena are really produced, it is self-evident that some kind of an explanation must be forthcoming.

There are but two possible answers from what is to-day known: either the minds of departed souls or the minds of those present in the flesh produce the phenomena. This eliminates any other possible agency, for the theory of ectoplasm cannot answer all of the facts.

Next: Psychic Phenomena and Immortality