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30.  Christ as Anointed (Christ) and as King.

In addition to these titles we must consider at the outset of our work that of Christ, and we must also consider that of King, and compare these two so as to find out the difference between them.  Now it is said in the forty-fourth Psalm, 4599 “Thou hast loved righteousness and hated iniquity, whence Thou art anointed (Christ) above Thy fellows.”  His loving righteousness and hating iniquity were thus added claims in Him; His anointing was not contemporary with His being nor inherited by Him from the first.  Anointing is a symbol of entering on the kingship, and sometimes also on the priesthood; and must we therefore conclude that the kingship of the Son of God is not inherited nor congenital to Him?  But how is it conceivable that the First-born of all creation was not a king and became a king afterwards because He loved righteousness, when, moreover, He Himself was righteousness?  We cannot fail to see that it is as a man that He is Christ, in respect of His soul, which was human and liable to be troubled and sore vexed, but that He is conceived as king in respect of the divine in Him.  I find support for this in the seventy-first Psalm, 4600 which says, “Give the king Thy judgment, O God, and Thy righteousness to the king’s Son, to judge Thy people in righteousness and Thy poor in judgment.”  This Psalm, though addressed to Solomon, is evidently a prophecy of Christ, and it is worth while to ask to what king the prophecy desires judgment to be given by God, and to what king’s Son, and what king’s righteousness is spoken of.  I conceive, then, that what is called the King is the leading nature of the First-born of all creation, to which judgment is given on account of its eminence; and that the man whom He assumed, formed and moulded by that nature, according to righteousness, is the King’s Son.  I am the more led to think that this is so, because the two beings are here brought together in one sentence, and are spoken of as if they were not two but one.  For the Saviour made both one, 4601 that is, He made them according to the prototype of the two which had been made one in Himself before all things.  The two I refer to human nature, since each man’s soul is p. 314 mixed with the Holy Spirit, and each of those who are saved is thus made spiritual.  Now as there are some to whom Christ is a shepherd, as we said before, because of their meek and composed nature, though they are less guided by reason; so there are those to whom He is a king, those, namely, who are led in their approach to religion rather by the reasonable part of their nature.  And among those who are under a king there are differences; some experience his rule in a more mystic and hidden and more divine way, others in a less perfect fashion.  I should say that those who, led by reason, apart from all agencies of sense, have beheld incorporeal things, the things which Paul speaks of as “invisible,” or “not seen,” that they are ruled by the leading nature of the Only-begotten, but that those who have only advanced as far as the reason which is conversant with sensible things, and on account of these glorify their Maker, that these also are governed by the Word, by Christ.  No offence need be taken at our distinguishing these notions in the Saviour; we draw the same distinctions in His substance.



Ps. xlv. 8.


Ps. 72:1, 2.


Ephes. ii. 14.

Next: Chapter XXXI