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Chapter XI.—The Fear of God.

“But some who are strangers to the truth, and who give their energies to the service of evil, on pretext of glorifying God, say that He has no figure, in order that, being shapeless and formless, He may be visible to no one, so as not to be longed for.  For the mind, not seeing the form of God, is empty of Him.  But how can any one pray if he has no one to whom he may flee for refuge, on whom he may lean?  For if he meets with no resistance, he falls out into vacuity.  Yea, says he, we ought not to fear God, but to love Him.  I agree; but the consciousness of having done well in each good act will accomplish this.  Now well-doing proceeds from fearing.  But fear, says he, strikes death into the soul.  Nay, but I affirm that it does not strike death, but awakens the soul, and converts it.  And perhaps the injunction not to fear God might be right, if we men did not fear many other things; such, for instance, as plots against us by those who are like us, and wild beasts, serpents, diseases, sufferings, demons, and a thousand other ills.  Let him, then, who asks us not to fear God, rescue us from these, that we may not fear them; but if he cannot, why should he grudge that we should be delivered from a thousand fears by one fear, the fear of the Just One, and that it should be possible by a slight 1344 faith in Him to remove a thousand afflictions from ourselves and others, and receive instead an exchange of blessings, and that, doing no ill in consequence of fear of the God who sees everything, we should continue in peace even in the present life.



The word “slight” is not used in reference to the character of the faith, but to indicate that the act of faith is a small act compared with the results that flow from it.

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