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Chapter XXII.—Motions of the Stars.

“But lest the assertion may seem doubtful respecting things which are not manifest to all, let us come to those things of which nobody is ignorant.  Who disposed the courses of the stars with so great reason, ordained their risings and settings, and appointed to each one to accomplish the circuit of the heavens in certain and regular times?  Who assigned to some to be always approaching to the setting, and others to be returning to the rising?  Who put a measure upon the courses of the sun, that he might mark out, by his diverse motions, hours, and days, and months, and changes of seasons?—that he might distinguish, by the sure measurement of his course, now winter, then spring, summer, and afterwards autumn, and always, by the same changes of the year, complete the circle with variety, without confusion?  Who, I say, will not pronounce that the director of such order is the very wisdom of God?  And these things we have spoken according to the relations given us by the Greeks respecting the science of the heavenly bodies.

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