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Chapter LVI.—No God Above the Creator.

“What kind of conduct, then, would it be that we should forsake God, in whose world we live and enjoy all things necessary for life, and follow I know not whom, from whom we not only obtain no good, but cannot even know that he exists?  Nor truly does he exist.  For whether you call him light, and brighter than that light which we see, you borrow that very name from the Creator of the world; or whether you say that he is a substance above all, you derive from Him the idea with enlargement of speech. 666   Whether you make mention of mind, or goodness, or life, or whatever else, you borrow the words from Him.  Since, then, you have nothing new conp. 113 cerning that power you speak of, not only as regards understanding, but even in respect of naming him, how do you introduce a new God, for whom you cannot even find a new name?  For not only is the Creator of the world called a Power, but even the ministers of His glory, and all the heavenly host.  Do you not then think it better that we should follow our Creator God, as a Father who trains us and endows us as He knows how?  But if, as you say, there be some God more benignant than all, it is certain that he will not be angry with us; or if he be angry, he is evil.  For if our God is angry and punishes, He is not evil, but righteous, for He corrects and amends His own sons.  But he who has no concern with us, if he shall punish us, how should he be good?  Inflicting punishments upon us because we have not been drawn by vain imaginations to forsake our own Father and follow him, how can you assert that he is so good, when he cannot be regarded as even just?”



That is, you take the idea of substance from the God of the Jews, and only enlarge it by the addition of the words above all.

Next: Chapter LVII