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p. 129


Man's work is not merely to exist on this earth, to scratch ignorantly at its surface, to mutilate Nature in every possible way, to fight and rob his neighbour, but to develop the powers surrounding him, to manipulate those forces that he may truly and deservedly claim his right to inherit the earth. A garden which has been neglected for years and is overgrown with weeds, when taken over by an intelligent human being who will work hand in hand with nature, may once again become a thing of beauty and joy. Thus the earth, which is man's garden, must be sown and cultivated by him, perfected by his art.

Life is not a haphazard game of chance, but an unfoldment and development of its own powers manifesting in perfect Law. Let us, then, try to understand this Life which is Eternal Law, pervaded by an Intelligence with Order and Wisdom, and having understood, let us work for the more perfect unfoldment of our earth and the forces which lie beneath its surface; for this Law applies to agriculture, to science, to the production of food, to the use of minerals and metals, to the building of cities, to the use of electricity and all natural forces. When man finally learns to use these forces, he will be able to press forward and onward to the final goal, which is the perfection of the earth and of his own species.

p. 130

Alchemy brings us the vision of the heights to which man may attain; it teaches us that he is Triune, that is, Spiritual, Mental, and Physical; that his future is far greater than at present can be envisaged; that, Life is Law and Wisdom.

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Those of you who have followed me thus far may be interested in the following extracts of Hermetic literature, both of which, apart from their intrinsic beauty, provide perfect examples of the highly mystical and intentionally enigmatic phraseology of alchemical writing.

The authorship of the first, the Tractatus Aureusi or Golden Treatise of Hermes, is unknown, despite the name it bears. It is, however, thought to be one of the most ancient and complete pieces of alchemical writing left to us, and has been held in high esteem by alchemists of all ages as a complete exposition of their art.

The second, the Book of the Revelation of Hermes, interpreted by Theophrastus Paracelsus, concerning the Supreme Secret of the World, was first published under the auspices of Benedictus Figulus in his 'Golden and Blessed Casket of Nature's Marvels,' in 1608 (a translation of which work was edited and introduced by Mr. Arthur Edward Waite in the latter part of the last century). Many of the truths enunciated therein are to be found in other works by writers of earlier and later times, but much of the phraseology is unique to Paracelsus himself.

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